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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 135-140

Oral health-related quality of life of preschool children with a cleft lip or palate and their families


Department of Public Health Dentistry, Ragas Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Divya Karikalan
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Ragas Dental College and Hospital, 2/102, East Coast Road, Uthandi, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/SDJ.SDJ_38_22

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Background: Cleft lip and cleft palate are the most common congenital developmental deformities found worldwide. Children with oral clefts have a range of functional and esthetic complications. Hence, the successful management of children born with oral clefts requires coordinated care provided by several specialties. Knowledge of oral health-related quality of life improves treatment quality as children with oral clefts require multidisciplinary care aiming at a satisfactory quality of life. Objectives: In this study, the aim was to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life of children with oral clefts aged two to six years who had undergone surgical treatment using the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (Tamil version). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted for parents with children born with cleft lip and cleft palate, who had undergone treatment at a Tertiary Care Centre, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, India. A sample of 60 parents was selected, and the oral health-related quality of life of their children was assessed by applying the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale questionnaire in Tamil language. Results: Comparison of the three groups i.e., cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and cleft palate, respectively, revealed no significant difference (P = 0.290) regarding the mean scores. Conclusion: Oral clefts and their treatment can negatively impact the quality of life of young children and their families, irrespective of the type of clefts. Therefore, the assessment of these influences can help clinicians and researchers improve the overall oral health outcomes of young children.


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